Health

Province should fund HPV immunizations for boys in Grade 8: U of T researcher

Sub-title: 
Ontario could save up to $28 million annually with step towards health equity
Author: 
Michael Kennedy

The province should consider publicly funding immunization against the human papillomavirus (HPV) for all boys and young men, says U of T social work researcher David Brennan – particularly when considering the long-term health of gay, bisexual, other men who have sex with men and those living with HIV.

His study paved the way for drugs that help millions (including his mother-in-law)

Sub-title: 
Daniel Drucker on the importance of basic science, commercialization and failure
Author: 
Jenny Hall

When Daniel Drucker was a postdoctoral fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital in the mid-1980s, he worked in a lab studying GLP-1, a hormone released in your gut after you eat.

Like any good scientist, he was motivated by curiosity. He wanted to know how this uncharted biological process worked and what effects it had in the body.

WHO backs U of T professor's recommendations for reducing pain of vaccines

Author: 
Michael Kennedy

When the World Health Organization asked University of Toronto Professor Anna Taddio for help increasing vaccination rates around the world her overriding message was: make the needles less painful and scary.

On May 29, WHO announced it will adopt many of the recommendations proposed by Taddio when she travelled to Geneva to address  its Strategic Advisory Group of Experts. (Read about why Taddio was invited to address the group.)

Redefining infant brain tumours to improve treatment

Sub-title: 
“There is no benefit in giving radiation, ” says Annie Huang. “Radiation can have devastating effects.”
Author: 
Katie Babcock

For years there was little hope for children diagnosed with rhabdoid brain tumours.

Infants with the rare disease would undergo surgery, chemotherapy and sometimes radiation, but these treatments had toxic side effects and often failed.

Now researchers from the University of Toronto have discovered how to categorize these tumours, allowing for more targeted treatment of this deadly disease.

Building healthier cities and communities, one collaboration at a time

Author: 
Nicole Bodnar

They are projects aimed at fostering a sense of community for people in apartment towers, making it safer for kids to bike and walk to school in rush hour – and helping homeless people deal with extreme temperatures while living on the city streets.  

On May 29, those initiatives got a boost from U of T’s Dalla Lana School of Public Health, the Wellesley Institute and Toronto Public Health through a collaboration called the Healthier Cities & Communities Hub.

One Sweet App: leading nutrition researcher helps consumers check sugar level of food – for free

Author: 
Michael Kennedy

She's known around the world for her scholarly research on the dangerous levels of sugar and salt creeping into North American diets.

Now, University of Toronto Professor Mary L’Abbé has helped develop a mobile app so anyone can avoid excess sugar consumption. 

New chip makes testing for antibiotic-resistant bacteria faster, easier

Sub-title: 
University of Toronto researchers' diagnostic chip reduces testing time from days to one hour, allowing doctors to pick the right antibiotic the first time
Author: 
Marit Mitchell

It’s a device that could transform a doctor’s ability to treat infections: a test for antibiotic resistance that works in just one hour – instead of several days. 

From Good to Gold: science and technology in high performance sport

Author: 
Cynthia Macdonald

When Dave Ross first started coaching trampoline athletes in the 1970s, sport and science weren’t nearly as intertwined as they are now. 

“We didn’t have nutritionists, sport psychologists, or biomechanists,” he says of the days before trampoline became an Olympic sport. “There was no support for the team the way there is now.”  

Restoring eyesight and healing brains: how hydrogels can boost the work of stem cells

Sub-title: 
U of T researchers show that engineered hydrogels not only help with stem cell transplantation, but actually speed healing in both the eye and brain
Author: 
Jovana Drinjakovic

It's a discovery that, in early lab trials, has been shown to partially reverse blindness and help the brain recover from stroke.

Using a gel-like biomaterial called a hydrogel, University of Toronto scientists and engineers have made a breakthrough in cell transplantation that keeps cells alive and helps them integrate better into tissue.

U of T researchers uncover new mode of cardiovascular communication

Sub-title: 
Discovery may lead to more targeted treatment
Author: 
Katie Babcock

Scientists have found that blood vessel cells have a deeper level of communication than previously believed – a discovery that could lead to new diagnostics and more targeted treatment for cardiovascular disease.

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