Health

U of T student-entrepreneur cuts through scholarly information overload with Trend MD

Author: 
Jenny Hall

Are you a researcher experiencing information overload as you try to keep up with research in your field? 

There’s a reason for that. Scholarly publishing isn’t immune to the information avalanche enabled by the digital revolution. In biomedicine alone, there are 5,000 new scholarly articles published every day, which can make it hard for readers to connect to the content they’re interested in – and for authors and publishers to ensure their work is read and has an impact.

Gun violence, murder and music: U of T sociologist explores wide range of subjects

Author: 
Dominic Ali

Gun violence is an ugly reality of life in North America. But how does it affect our cities or the social fabric of our neighbourhoods?

University of Toronto assistant professor Jooyoung Lee is delving into this issue. 

Anxiety and pain: two sides of the same synapse?

Sub-title: 
"When you have chronic pain, you develop anxiety. Because you have anxiety, you suffer more chronic pain," says Professor Min Zhuo
Author: 
Jim Oldfield

Researchers have known for a decade what patients have suspected much longer: chronic pain produces anxiety, and anxiety makes the pain worse. But why? Scientists have found tantalizing clues, including intense activity in the same part of the brain during both sensations. But an answer has been elusive.

Now, neuroscientists at the University of Toronto have mapped a mechanism in the brain’s anterior cingulate cortex, or ACC, that could explain the link between anxiety and chronic pain.

Quitting smoking? Read this first

Sub-title: 
Researchers from University of Toronto and the University of Pennsylvania can tell whether smokers will fare better with nicotine patch or varenicline pills
Author: 
Michael Kennedy

If you’re trying to quit smoking, new research from the University of Toronto suggests the first thing you need to understand is your DNA. 

U of T public health students send Ebola equipment to Sierra Leone hospitals

Author: 
Nicole Bodnar

Front-line health workers in Sierra Leone now have protective equipment, thanks to three University of Toronto public health students.

Working with Save the Children  – a global NGO dedicated to children’s rights – three first-year epidemiology students in U of T’s Dalla Lana School of Public Health successfully facilitated the delivery of masks, gloves, disinfectant and other much-needed Ebola protective supplies to Njala University in Bo, Sierra Leone.

Year in Review: 6 vital health stories from 2014

Sub-title: 
Working to improve the understanding, diagnosis, treatment and prevention of illness
Author: 
Michael Kennedy

In 2014 the University of Toronto continued its legacy of life-changing discovery and solidified its reputation as a global medical-research powerhouse. 

Scientists discover tiny gene fragments linked to brain development and autism

Sub-title: 
"We were amazed by the extent to which microexons are misregulated in people with autism," says Professor Benjamin Blencowe
Author: 
Jim Oldfield

Very small segments of genes called “microexons” influence how proteins interact with each other in the nervous system, say scientists at the University of Toronto.

It's a discovery that opens up a new line of research into the cause of autism.

Machine learning reveals unexpected genetic roots of cancers, autism and other disorders

Sub-title: 
Researchers from engineering, biology and medicine teach computers to ‘read the human genome’ and rate likelihood of mutations causing disease, opening vast new possibilities for medicine
Author: 
Marit Mitchell

In the decade since the genome was sequenced in 2003, scientists, engineers and doctors have struggled to answer an all-consuming question: Which DNA mutations cause disease? 

A new computational technique developed at the University of Toronto may now be able to tell us.

Still too salty: slight decrease in sodium levels for some foods at chain restaurants, whopping increase for others

Author: 
Jim Oldfield

Researchers at the University of Toronto have found that sodium levels in Canadian chain restaurant meals have changed little since 2010, despite the food industry’s commitment to offer more meals with less sodium.

The researchers analyzed nutrition information from 61 sit-down and fast-food restaurants in 2013 and found that compared to levels in 2010, 54 per cent of foods did not change. In 30 per cent of foods, the amount of sodium decreased marginally and in 16 per cent of foods, levels increased.

Fighting Ebola in West Africa: alumna Stefanie Carmichael

Sub-title: 
"When I was called to join the Ebola response, I couldn’t say no"
Author: 
Terry Lavender

Reactions to the ongoing Ebola crisis in West Africa have been varied – from cancelled flights to highly-publicized quarantines to heroic efforts by nurses and doctors to treat the afflicted. Many people are trying to help out however they can, including Stefanie Carmichael, a U of T alumna now working for the United Nations.

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