Health

Salt levels in restaurant meals "alarmingly high" – legislation needed, says researcher

Sub-title: 
"There is an urgent need for legislation that requires both calorie and sodium information on restaurant menus," says Mary L’Abbé
Author: 
Jim Oldfield

University of Toronto researchers have found that a large majority of Canadians want nutrition information on restaurant menus – and that many would use it to make healthier food choices.

Global Health Summit: improving health through innovative city design

Author: 
Elaine Smith

As more and more of the world’s population migrates to cities to seek employment, health-care professionals are thinking about ways to ensure that those cities provide healthy environments for large numbers of people.

Research helps bring tastier, healthier milk and meat to Ontario consumers

Sub-title: 
Showing farmers how an animal's diet affects the nutritional value of the food on your table
Author: 
Jim Oldfield

Ontario’s Rolling Meadow Dairy has launched a line of milk this fall from cows that eat mainly grass. This new alternative – which is a better choice for consumers concerned about fat — is informed by the work of a University of Toronto researcher.

Making cities more accessible for everyone

Sub-title: 
Ron Buliung on active transport and inclusive design
Author: 
Dominic Ali

Ron Buliung’s interest in urban design initially started with his travels to Europe and India where he saw how different cities dealt with issues such as space, wealth, poverty, street life, congestion and transport.

But his research became intensely personal with the birth of his youngest daughter, who was born with the genetic neuromuscular disease known as spinal muscular atrophy. The disease profoundly limits her physical mobility, and she requires a power chair to move around on her own. 

Global Health Summit: the grand convergence

Author: 
Elaine Smith

The issue: In a widely read 2013 article, "Global Health 2013: The Grand Convergence," the Lancet revisited the case for investment in health and developed a new investment framework to achieve dramatic health gains by 2035.

A doctor's take on alternative medicine

Author: 
Michael Kennedy

Dr. Mel Borins wants to you to be healthy and he wants you equipped with more than just your family doctor’s orders.

A family physician and associate professor of medicine at the University of Toronto, Borins is a leading expert in health and wellness who has advocated evidence-based, alternative medicine for decades.

Transatlantic Science Week 2014 at U of T

Sub-title: 
Arctic experts to tackle challenges from climate to health to human rights
Author: 
Nicole Bodnar and Sarah McDonald

As the world grapples with the question of how best to address climate change, many scientists are looking to some of the coldest places on Earth for answers.

Transatlantic Science Week 2014 (TSW2014) brings together scientists, policy-makers and industry leaders from Norway, Canada and the United States to share knowledge and approaches for dealing with the challenges unique to the Arctic, with a focus on societies, sustainability and safety. The conference also aims to strengthen the link between research and education surrounding arctic issues.

Global Health Summit: exploring power, politics and privilege

Author: 
Elaine Smith

What roles do power, politics and privilege play in public health? 

That’s one of the questions participants can explore at the University of Toronto’s upcoming Global Health Summit, Creating a Pandemic of Health, organized by the Dalla Lana School of Public Health from November 3 to 5.  

Children who drink non-cow's milk twice as likely to have low vitamin D

Sub-title: 
In children, low levels of vitamin D can cause bone weakness or, in severe cases, rickets
Author: 
Geoff Koehler

Children who drink non-cow’s milk such as rice, almond, soy or goat’s milk, have lower levels of vitamin D in their blood than those who drink cow’s milk, new research published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal has found.

Non-cow’s milk is becoming increasingly popular because of perceived health benefits, milk allergies or lactose intolerance.

Ebola: controlling outbreak in West Africa most effective way to decrease international risk, paper says

Sub-title: 
Focus on "exit screening" not "entry screening" says Dr. Kamran Khan
Author: 
Leslie Shepherd

Controlling the Ebola virus outbreak at the source in West Africa is the most effective way to decrease international risk of transmission, a new study published in The Lancet has found.

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